CLIP-ings: December 4, 2015

Internet Governance

Safe Bay For ISPs: A Swedish court ruled that internet service providers cannot be compelled to block access to Pirate Bay, nor held liable for copyright infringement by the file sharing site’s users, because merely hosting the site does not sufficiently constitute participation as required by Swedish law.

Privacy

Broken Pledge: The Electronic Frontier Foundation filed an FTC complaint against Google, alleging that the company broke the Student Privacy Pledge it signed last year by collecting and mining student data through its Chromebook and Google Apps for Education technologies.

Dear John: A Los Angeles city councilwoman proposed a measure that would use license plate reader technology to keep track of vehicles driving in areas known for prostitution and send letters to the registered owners’ addresses.

Information Security And Cyberthreats

This Is Not A Toy: Hong Kong-based toymaker VTech suffered one of the largest security breaches in recent history, revealing personal information such as photos, names, and personal addresses of nearly 5 million adults and over 200,000 children, in part due to inadequate security measures.

Intellectual Property

Meta Domain: A German museum sued the Wikimedia Foundation for hosting photographs of public domain works of art arguing that, although the works themselves are in the public domain, the photographs of the works are still protected by copyright.

Free Expression And Censorship

Mission eFOIA: The FBI streamlined the FOIA request process by implementing a beta version of an electronic request system; previously individuals could only make FOIA requests by mail, email, or fax.

Practice Note

Third Amendment, Reinterpreted? A California assemblyman argues that the little-used Third Amendment – which prevents soldiers from using citizens’ homes as their own without consent during peacetime – could be interpreted to favor halting mass government surveillance.

On The Lighter Side

Spoiler Alert: This Google Chrome browser extension warns users when a webpage contains plot spoilers for the upcoming blockbuster Star Wars: The Force Awakens.


Joel R. Reidenberg
Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Chair and Professor of Law and Founding Academic Director, CLIP

N. Cameron Russell
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

Thomas B. Norton
Privacy Fellow, Fordham CLIP

Tory Geronimo
Dean’s Fellow, Fordham CLIP

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