CLIP-ings: October 22, 2021

Internet Governance

Lawmakers Accuse Amazon Of Misleading Congress: Following reports that Amazon uses third-party seller data to create and promote its own products, five members of the House Judiciary Committee claim in a letter to the company that the reporting “directly contradicts” the previous sworn testimony of Amazon representatives, including CEO Jeff Bezos; the Committee is considering referring the matter to the Department of Justice, and has offered Amazon the opportunity to “correct the record.” 

UK Competition Authority Fines Facebook $70 Million For “Deliberate” Rulebreaking Around Giphy Acquisition: The fine, which is by far the largest of its kind, was levied after the Competition and Markets Authority found that the company “consciously” failed to comply with an “initial enforcement order” related to the acquisition by “significantly limit[ing] the scope of” reporting required by the order.
Privacy

Nine UK Schools Deploy Facial Recognition Tech To Speed Up Lunch Lines: The system, which ties into “encrypted faceprint templates” and students’ cashless payment accounts, has reduced transaction time to five seconds per student; although ninety-seven percent of parents have consented to the system’s implementation, privacy advocates are concerned about a lack of transparency surrounding the data use and disclosure practices of the biometrics company that provides it.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Japanese Man Pleads Guilty To Uncensoring Pornographic Videos Using Deepfake Technology: A website operator pleaded guilty to charges of violating copyright and obscenity laws after he was arrested for using artificial intelligence to digitally reconstruct genitalia in pornographic videos, which would otherwise be blurred out or pixelated, and then selling the altered content online. 

Commerce Department To Issue New Rules Towards Limiting Resale And Export Of Commercial Hacking Tools: Under the rules, American companies that wish to sell “certain items that can be used for malicious cyber activities” such as commercial spyware and other intrusion software to countries “of national security or weapons of mass destruction concern,” or to those subject to arms embargoes, must first secure a license from the Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security.
Free Expression and Censorship

Vienna Museum Consortium Hosts Nude Artworks On OnlyFans After Facing Censorship On Traditional Social Media Platforms: The city tourism board’s “Vienna Laid Bare” campaign comes in response to what it calls a “new wave of prudishness” on the part of other social media platforms that has led to the censorship of artworks featuring nudity under the platforms’ policies against sexually explicit content.
Practice Note

FCC Will Consider Rules Banning Robotexting: After the Commission mandated that phone companies implement technology to cut down on robocalls earlier this year, it has now signaled it will next tackle robotexts, which have generated more than 9,800 consumer complaints so far in 2021.
On the Lighter Side

What’s In A Name? After reports suggested that Facebook may be planning a re-brand, the internet was quick to joke about a potential name change for the social network.
If you enjoy reading CLIP-ings, please consider making a contribution to Fordham CLIP. Your support provides crucial funding at a time when the study of information law and policy is more important than ever.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: October 15, 2021

Internet Governance

Facebook Oversight Board Seeks Insight From Whistleblower: Whistleblower Frances Haugen accepted an invitation from the Oversight Board to “discuss [her] experiences” as part of an investigation about whether the social network “has been fully forthcoming” about its content moderation practices.

FTC Warns Companies About Fake Reviews And Deceptive Endorsements: In a notice sent to over 700 large companies including “top advertisers, leading retailers, top consumer product companies, and major advertising agencies,” the Commission announced that it is prepared to levy fines up to $43,792 per violation for the use of fake reviews and other forms of deceptive endorsements.
Privacy

Google Removes Ads For Stalkerware Apps: The company removed a number of ads for stalkerware applications that used “a variety of techniques” designed to circumvent a ban on such advertisements imposed last summer under Google’s policy on enabling dishonest behavior; the policy, which does not extend the ban to child-tracking or employee-monitoring apps, has been criticized for allowing stalkerware apps to “skirt the rules by changing the face of what they’re selling, without changing the core technology within.”
Information Security and Cyberthreats

White House Hosts Ransomware Summit: In the wake of numerous cyberattacks on high-profile businesses and government entities, the White House hosted more than 30 countries in a virtual meeting to discuss how to counter ransomware attacks and hold cybercriminals accountable.

Facebook Restricts Access To Internal Message Boards To Prevent Further Leaks: As it deals with the fallout from the recent leak of a huge trove of internal documents by whistleblower Frances Haugen, the company has made some groups on its internal message boards about platform safety and election integrity private.
Free Expression and Censorship

Facebook Updates Bullying And Harassment Policies To Ban Sexualizing Public Figures And Coordinated Attacks: Under the updated policy, Facebook will remove profiles, pages, groups, and events that engage in “severe sexualizing content” toward celebrities, politicians, and content creators, as well as language that could incite coordinated attacks on users that are at a “heightened risk of offline harm.”
Practice Note

Australian Court Allows Defamation Case To Proceed Over Poorly-Punctuated Facebook Post: After the country’s High Court ruled last month that media companies could be held liable for user comments posted on their content, another Australian court allowed a defamation case brought by an employer against an employee to proceed because the defendant-employee’s omission of an apostrophe in one word of his Facebook post might suggest a “systematic pattern of conduct” on the part of the employer.
On the Lighter Side

Tesla Unveils Gigabeer To Celebrate Gigafactory: The brew has been released in vessels that “vaguely recall[ ]” the company’s Cybertruck to celebrate the start of production at Tesla’s new Berlin plant.
If you enjoy reading CLIP-ings, please consider making a contribution to Fordham CLIP. Your support provides crucial funding at a time when the study of information law and policy is more important than ever.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: October 8, 2021

Internet Governance

Facebook Whistleblower Provides Roadmap For Increased Accountability: In testimony before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, Frances Haugen, the former Facebook employee who leaked internal company documents to journalists and others, recommended changes that could be made to increase Facebook’ accountability, including reforming Section 230 to make Facebook responsible for the consequences of its content-ranking algorithms.

DOJ Creates Cryptocurrency Unit: The National Cryptocurrency Enforcement Team will be made up of members of the Department’s money laundering, computer crimes, and intellectual property divisions and will focus on “crimes committed by virtual currency exchanges, mixing and tumbling services, and money laundering infrastructure actors.”
Privacy

European Parliament Adopts Resolution To Ban Facial Recognition: The resolution, which was adopted “overwhelmingly in favor,” calls to ban both the use of facial recognition by police in public spaces and predictive policing techniques, as well as private facial recognition databases and social scoring systems.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Server Error To Blame For Massive Twitch Data Leak: The popular video streaming service announced that human error related to a “server configuration change” left the server vulnerable to access “by a malicious third party”; the leaked data, which includes internal code and documents, payout data, and work-in-progress could amount to “nearly the full digital footprint of Twitch.”

DOJ Announces Crackdown On Federal Contractors Who Hide Data Breaches: Under the Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative, the Department will leverage the False Claims Act to bring civil suits against government contractors who knowingly violate obligations to monitor and report cybersecurity incidents, as well as those who knowingly misrepresent or provide deficient cybersecurity products or services.
Intellectual Property

EU To File Antitrust Charges Against Apple Over Tap-To-Pay Tech: The charges follow an investigation from last year that focused on the built-in electronics that facilitate the tap-to-pay function, which are “tightly integrated with Apple Pay and not open to rival payment systems.”
Free Expression and Censorship

YouTube Terminates Two R. Kelly Channels: The company closed down two video channels associated with the rapper in accordance with its Creator Responsibility Guidelines after Kelly was recently found guilty of sex trafficking.
On the Lighter Side

Internet Archive Creates “Wayforward Machine”: The nonprofit known for creating the Wayback Machine digital archive of the internet has released the Wayforward Machine, which offers a glimpse of what the group foresees the internet might look like in 2046.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: October 1, 2021

Internet Governance

Facebook Shares Annotated Internal Research In Lead-Up To Congressional Testimony: Prior to appearing before Congress late this week, and in the wake of a recent investigation by The Wall Street Journal that prompted the hearings about the social networks’ effects on teens’ mental health, Facebook released annotated versions of its internal research into the matter to counter the reporting and contextualize the findings.
Privacy

Amazon Ring’s Home-Security Drone Now In Testing: As part of an invite-only program, people will now be able to test Ring’s “Always Home Cam,” which is designed to fly around and “patrol” properties while occupants aren’t home; to curb privacy concerns, the drone “issues an audible warning” when recording occurs, and the camera is “obscured” when the drone is idle.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Far-Right Organizations Suffer Hacks: Five gigabytes of data belonging to the Oath Keepers militia group, including emails, chat logs, donor lists, and other information, were made publicly available earlier this week; on Tuesday, hacking group Anonymous published data from Epik, the web hosting company popular among far-right platforms, which it had breached earlier this month.
Intellectual Property

National Music Publishers’ Association Reaches Agreement With Roblox: After making a similar deal with streaming platform Twitch last week, the NMPA has settled a $200 million copyright suit against the popular gaming platform; under the settlement, NMPA members have an option to negotiate their own licensing deals with Roblox.
Free Expression and Censorship

CNN Restricts Certain Content In Australia Following Court Ruling: In response to a recent ruling by the country’s highest court that exposes media companies to liability for others’ comments on their social media posts, CNN has blocked Australian users from viewing its primary Facebook page, its CNN International page, and others.

YouTube Expands Vaccine Misinformation Ban To Include All Vaccines: After concluding that falsehoods about the COVID-19 vaccine “spill over into misinformation about vaccines in general,” the company will expand its ban on vaccine misinformation to cover “long-approved vaccines”; certain vaccine content, such as “personal testimonies relating to vaccines,” will be allowed to remain on the site.
Practice Note

New Jersey Lawyer Absolved Of Ethics Charges Based On Facebook Friending Opposing Party: The New Jersey Supreme Court concluded that the lawyer, who had directed a paralegal to use Facebook to connect with and download content from a represented opposing party in 2008, had a “good faith misunderstanding about the nature” of the social network’s privacy practices at the time, when he didn’t fully comprehend the concept of Facebook friendship and thought all content posted on the site was “for the world to see.”
On the Lighter Side

Let Me Google That For You: “Google” is the most commonly searched word on Microsoft’s Bing browser, according to the record in court proceedings in the EU.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: September 24, 2021

Internet Governance

Facebook Oversight Board Investigates Allegations That The Company Shielded High-Profile Rulebreakers: In the wake of an exposé by The Wall Street Journal that suggested that the social media company refrained from enforcing its policies against some high-profile rulebreakers, the Board has asked Facebook for more transparency about it’s “cross-check” system, an internal program for reviewing content from politicians, journalists, and celebrities.

Internal Facebook Documents Reveal That Apple Threatened To Ban The Social Network For Facilitating Human Trafficking: The documents reveal that the threat to remove Facebook products from the App Store came in 2019, after the BBC alerted Apple that one of its investigations exposed “a booming online black market in the illegal buying and selling of domestic workers.”
Privacy

Senate Democrats Ask FTC To Craft New Data Privacy Rules: In a letter that referenced tech companies’ frequent rule-breaking and the resulting effect on consumers, a group of nine Democratic senators asked the Commission to commence a rulemaking to devise rules addressing privacy, civil rights, and consumer data collection.

Apple Reportedly Working With UCLA, Biogen, To Detect Depression, Anxiety, And Cognitive Decline: Reports indicate that the early-stage research relies on data collected from iPhone cameras, keyboards, and audio sensors, as well as Apple Watch movement and sleep data; to preserve privacy, the company plans to process data locally on devices without sending it to Apple servers.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

106 Arrests Made In European Cybercrime Ring Crackdown: Police say that the group of arrestees includes computer and money-laundering experts who perpetrated phishing schemes, business email attacks, and SIM swapping schemes and who have ties to the Italian mafia.
Intellectual Property

Twitch, National Music Publishers’ Association, Reach Deal On Unauthorized Music Use: The agreement between the popular live-streaming platform and the Association includes a settlement for streamers’ past usage of unlicensed music, a new process for reporting the use of unlicensed content, and a timetable for the parties to agree on how music may be used on the platform in the future.
Free Expression and Censorship

Citing Censorship Concerns, Lithuanian Defense Ministry Urges Consumers To Discard Chinese Phones: A report by the Lithuanian Defense Ministry’s National Cyber Security Center concluded that smartphones sold by China’s Xiaomi Corp “have a built-in ability to detect and censor” certain terms, including “Free Tibet” and “democracy movement,” and urges consumers to use other devices.
On the Lighter Side

A Picture Is Worth A Thousand Bites: Uber Eats has introduced a new feature that lets you search for your favorite foods on the app using emojis.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: September 17, 2021

Internet Governance

Congress Initiates Investigation Into Instagram’s Effect On Teens: After The Wall Street Journal reported on Instagram’s awareness that use of its platform leads to negative mental health effects for teenagers, members of the Senate’s consumer protection subcommittee announced that they will seek information and testimony from Facebook related to the issue; other congress members have written to Facebook, urging it to halt its plan to create an Instagram for kids.
Privacy

Biden Nominates Facial-Recognition And Surveillance Critic To FTC: The nomination of Alvaro Bedoya, who has been critical of facial recognition and other digital surveillance technologies for their impact on civil liberties—especially among marginalized groups—has been lauded among privacy and consumer advocacy experts and reaffirms the expectation that the Commission will strongly focus on Big Tech’s influence.

DoorDash Sues New York City Over Customer-Data-Sharing Law: The lawsuit argues that the ordinance, which was passed in July and requires food delivery services to share customer information with restaurants, is unconstitutional and violates customers’ privacy; many restaurants support the law because it helps ensure that they retain customers even if they stop using a delivery platform.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Apple Issues Emergency Software Updates To Patch Security Flaw That Allows Spyware To Access Devices Without Users’ Knowledge: The highly-invasive spyware by controversial company NSO, which can activate and access a device’s camera, microphone, messages, emails, calls, and other data, was discovered on a Saudi activists’ iPhone by cybersecurity watchdog CitizenPro; more than 1.65 billion Apple devices may have been vulnerable to the spyware since March.
Intellectual Property

Apple Uncertain About Appeal In Case Against Epic: After a ruling last week that dismissed nearly all of Epic’s claims but which found that Apple’s anti-steering rules, which prohibit app developers from informing users about payment systems other than Apple’s in-app system, violate California law, the company has yet to decide whether to appeal and is focusing on how it might revise its terms to comply with a court order requiring it to allow developers to link to third-party payment systems.
Free Expression and Censorship

TikTok Bans Posts Of “Devious Licks” Trend: The company says that the trend, which involves posting about stealing items from schools, violates its community guidelines; the company is altering search results and deleting hashtags related to the trend.
Practice Note

FTC Extends Health Breach Notification Rule To Health Apps: In a policy statement issued this week, the Commission concluded that the 2009 Rule, which requires that vendors of personal health records notify consumers in the event of a data breach, also applies to health apps that process sensitive health information.
On the Lighter Side

Augmented Reality Steals The Show During One NFL Team’s Opening Weekend: In a viral tweet, the Carolina Panthers show a giant, augmented-reality panther bounding around the team’s stadium during last Sunday’s game.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: September 10, 2021

Internet Governance

High Court Of Australia Finds Media Companies Liable For Third-Party Comments On Their Facebook Posts: In a defamation case brought against three major publishing companies, the court reasoned that the companies’ facilitating and encouraging the posting of third-party comments on their posts “rendered them publishers of those comments” who should “bear the legal consequences” of them.
Privacy

Documents Reveal LAPD Officers Collect Citizens’ Social Media Info: Internal documents recently obtained by the Brennan Center for Justice reveal that officers are instructed to collect the social media account information of every person they interview, regardless of whether they are arrested or accused of a crime; the information is said to be critical for use in “investigations, arrests, and prosecutions,” but privacy advocates warn that it aids in the expansion of network surveillance and predictive policing.

WhatsApp Messages Capable Of Review Despite End-To-End Encryption: A recent investigation by ProPublica revealed that end-to-end-encrypted messages sent through the app may be subject to AI or human review if a recipient flags a message as “improper”; the report also reveals that Facebook, the messaging service’s owner, may share unencrypted message metadata with law enforcement and others.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Howard University Closes In Response To Ransomware Attack: The university cancelled classes and shut down its network early this week to evaluate the impact of a ransomware attack; on Wednesday, Howard partially reopened as it continues to investigate the hack.

New Zealand Banks And Post Offices Hit In Continuing DDoS Attack: A distributed denial-of-service attack that began last week against one of the country’s largest ISPs has seemingly continued, with banks, post offices, and a weather forecaster targeted in a new wave of activity; government officials have said little about who is responsible for the attacks.
Intellectual Property

Spotify Playlist Creators Face Takedown Abuse: According to playlist curators, the music streaming service doesn’t do enough to curb bad actors, who report popular playlists so that their own playlists get more visibility once the reported ones are removed.
Free Expression and Censorship

Brazil’s Bolsonaro Bans Social Media Companies From Censoring Some Content: Under new rules issued this week, platforms may only remove certain specified content and would have to obtain a court order to remove other content, which makes it more challenging for social media sites to moderate misinformation around topics such as COVID-19 and election fraud; the rules are provisional in nature and will expire after 120 days unless the country’s congress makes them permanent, which analysts expect won’t happen, as numerous lawsuits are already underway to block the measures.
On the Lighter Side

Show Me Where It Hurts, Using Emojis: A team of researchers is exploring the use of emojis and similar iconography to assist in creating “standardisation, universality and familiarity” in medical diagnosis and recovery.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: September 3, 2021

Internet Governance

South Korea Passes Law Forcing Apple, Google, To Allow Third-Party Payment Processing: The amendment to the country’s Telecommunications Business Act, which awaits the signature of President Moon Jae-in, will prevent platforms from requiring app developers to rely on built-in payment systems and will allow for the use of outside payment processors; Google and Apple contend that the model threatens the quality, security, and effectiveness of their platforms.

House Minority Leader Threatens Retaliation Against Tech Companies That Comply With January 6th Commission Preservation Orders: Representative McCarthy vowed to “hold accountable” any of the 35 technology companies that comply with requests by a special committee to preserve the phone and social-media records of 11 Congress members who are being scrutinized for their potential role in the January insurrection.
Privacy

Australia Passes Government Surveillance Bill: The Surveillance Legislation Amendment (Identify and Disrupt) Bill 2020, which passed both houses of the federal parliament this week, authorizes law enforcement to target criminal activity through three new warrants that permit the modification or deletion of suspects’ data, allow for the collection of information about criminal network activity, and enable law enforcement to take over suspects’ online accounts.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Security Experts Suspect Microsoft Exchange Hack Intended To Siphon Data For AI Training: An attack on Microsoft Exchange servers in March by a group of cybercriminals associated with the Chinese government that targeted a broad range of businesses could have been for the purpose of collecting data to train AI systems, experts suggest.
Free Expression and Censorship

Texas Poised To Ban Censorship Of Conservative Content By Social Media Platforms: The bill, which passed in a special session this summer and now awaits Governor Abbott’s signature, makes it illegal for social media sites with more than 50 million users to censor content based on political views or geographic location; a similar law in Florida was struck down earlier this year for being “wholly at odds with accepted constitutional principles.”

Reddit Bans Popular Misinformation Subreddit: After other subreddits called for the platform to take action to curb the spread of misinformation, the site banned r/NoNewNormal, a subreddit that became a breeding ground for COVID-19 misinformation; Reddit cites frequent brigades—where members of one subreddit flood to another en masse to harass—as the reason for the ban.
Practice Note

Irish Data Protection Commission Fines WhatsApp €225 Million For GDPR Violations: After a lengthy investigation that began in 2018, the Commission fined the Facebook-owned messaging app for failing to fulfill its obligations under the GDPR to be transparent about its data processing practices.
On the Lighter Side

Apple, Eight States, Partner To Add IDs To Apple Wallet: The states that have enrolled in the program will allow people to add their state IDs or driver’s licenses to their Apple Wallet for use at TSA airport security checkpoints.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: August 27, 2021

Internet Governance

FCC Proposes $5.1 Million Fine For Anti-Voting Robocallers: The proposed fine, which is the largest to date under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, is against two right-wing conspiracy theorists who orchestrated over 1,100 robocalls designed to convince members of the Black community not to vote by mail by telling recipients that vote-by-mail data would be used to surface old warrants and collect debts.
Privacy

UK Plans To Revamp Privacy Rules For Post-Brexit: As Britain plans to welcome a new Information Commissioner in November, it also plans to overhaul its privacy rules by moving away from EU-style regulations in favor of rules that prioritize “innovative and responsible uses of data,” and that are designed to “boost growth, especially for startups and small firms, speed up scientific discoveries and improve public services.”

Federal Government Plans Increased Use Of Facial Recognition: Despite growing concerns about the technology—and outright bans of it in some locales—a new report by the Government Accountability Office reveals that at least ten federal agencies plan to expand its use by 2023, including to monitor threats and pursue criminals.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Companies Pledge Billions To Strengthen Cybersecurity: In the wake of recent high-profile cyberattacks, leaders from some of the nation’s biggest companies, including Big Tech, met with President Biden in a cybersecurity summit and committed billions to improve cybersecurity across the economy.
Intellectual Property

Popular Discord Music Bot Groovy Will Shut Down After YouTube Crackdown: The Groovy Bot, which is popular on the Discord platform and which lets Discord users play music from YouTube videos on their servers, will shut down at the end of August after receiving notice from YouTube that the bot violates its terms.
Free Expression and Censorship

Facebook Promotes FDA-Approved Pfizer COVID-19 Vaccine: The social network announced that it will start “sharing messages across Facebook in both English and Spanish” about the vaccine’s approval, and will also update its policies to allow for the removal of claims that there are no FDA-approved vaccines. 

OnlyFans Reverses Ban On Adult Content: After announcing earlier this week that it would ban sexually explicit content starting October 1, the content-sharing site made popular by sex workers reversed course; the ban and its subsequent reversal are purportedly tied to banks’ attitudes toward supporting sex work.
On the Lighter Side Clip-Art Rock NFT Sells For $1.3 Million:

An EtherRock, a brand of NFT that has been around since 2017, recently sold for the equivalent of $1.3 million, highlighting a second surge in NFT popularity that has major brands such as Visa and Taco Bell joining the game.
Ron Lazebnik
Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton
Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: August 20, 2021

Internet Governance

Senators Call Upon FTC To Investigate Tesla’s Self-Driving Claims: Just days after the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration opened an investigation into accidents between Teslas and emergency vehicles, two senators have asked the Commission to examine whether the company has “overstated the capabilities of its vehicles” to perform fully autonomously.
Privacy

Taliban Seizes U.S. Military-Used Biometric Devices: Some fear that the devices, which store iris scans, fingerprints, and biographical information from thousands of Afghan nationals and coalition forces, could be used by the Taliban to identify and retaliate against Afghans who assisted the United States during its 20-year presence in the country; similarly, U.S. agencies have begun removing content from their websites and social media channels that the Taliban might view as evidence of collaboration.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

47 Million Customer Records Exposed In T-Mobile Data Breach: The names, birthdates, Social Security numbers, and driver’s license numbers of over 40 million former or prospective customers and nearly 8 million current customers were stolen; although the stolen files did not include “phone numbers, account numbers, PINs or passwords,” the stolen information could be used to create accounts in another’s name or to hijack existing accounts.

Poly Network Offers $600 Million Thief A Job: A week after falling victim to theft, the blockchain company offered the thief, known as Mr. White Hat, $500,000 in Ethereum as a bug bounty award, as well as a job as the company’s Chief Security Advisor; Mr. White hat, who perpetrated the hack for fun and has yet to return $238 million of the stolen funds, hasn’t indicated whether he’ll accept the position.
Free Expression and Censorship

Taliban Social Media Campaigns Defy Bans, Create Complications For Social Media Companies: As new social media content from the group has ramped up as it has taken control of Afghanistan, social media companies struggle to enforce bans on content from the group, and are attempting to gauge whether world governments might officially recognize the group as Afghanistan’s leadership.

Facebook Cracks Down On The “Disinformation Dozen”: A month after the White House publicly acknowledged a report finding that twelve individuals are responsible for nearly 65 percent of Covid-19 misinformation on the platform, a Facebook spokesperson announced that the platform had removed three dozen pages, groups, and Instagram accounts associated with the twelve individuals for violating Facebook policies.
Practice Note

Binance Faces Unconventional Arbitration For May 2021 Outage: After a significant outage that led to millions of dollars in losses for over 700 customers affected the cryptocurrency platform earlier this year, a group of plaintiffs has commenced in an international business arbitration court proceedings funded by a blockchain-traded litigation firm.  
On the Lighter Side

Minecraft Alternative Helps Children With Autism Connect: Autcraft, a version of the popular online building game Minecraft designed specifically for children with autism and their families, has been observed by researchers to help autistic children practice social skills and make friends.
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP