CLIP-ings: July 9, 2021

Internet Governance

Three Dozen States Sue Google Over Alleged App Store Monopoly: Thirty-six states and the District of Columbia argue in the suit that the company uses anti-competitive tactics to limit competition in Android app distribution to preserve its 30 percent commission from developers who make their apps available on the Google Play app store; the company counters that the suit ignores Google’s openness to alternative means of app distribution and is designed to benefit a handful of major app developers.

Twitter Purportedly Stripped Of Immunity For User-Generated Content In India: A filing by the Modi administration in a defamation case against the company announced that Twitter has lost its protection from liability as a result of its repeated failure to comply with the country’s IT rules.
Privacy

EU Allows Tech Companies To Screen Messages For Child Sex Abuse: The temporary emergency measures, which were passed after last year’s European Electronics Communications Code inadvertently prohibited companies from screening for content related to child sex abuse, allow companies to resume such screening; although the screening must be conducted under human oversight, including by data protection authorities, lawmakers express concern that the measures threaten privacy.
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Russian Hackers Target GOP Systems: State-backed hackers affiliated with the Cozy Bear hacking group attacked Synnex, a contractor that provides tech services to the Republican National Committee; the hack bears similarities to the SolarWinds attack, and comes in the wake of numerous other recent attacks on U.S. infrastructure.
Intellectual Property

Biden To Issue Executive Order Supporting Right-To-Repair: The order will ask the Federal Trade Commission to establish rules that prohibit companies from preventing consumers from performing their own repairs or having repairs performed by third-parties; while the order will be focused on the agriculture industry, it may ultimately have an impact on everyday tech.
Free Expression and Censorship

Trump Sues Facebook, Twitter, And Google Over Alleged Censorship: In suits against the tech companies and their CEOs, the former president alleges that the companies’ bans of his social media accounts following the January 6th insurrection violate his First Amendment rights; consensus among legal experts is that the suits are meritless, and the pro-Trump nonprofit America First Policy Institute has used the suits as a fundraising opportunity.

Big Tech Companies Threaten To Cease Operations In Hong Kong Over Doxxing Law: Through the tech alliance Asia Internet Coalition, companies such as Facebook, Google, and Twitter have communicated to Hong Kong authorities that they may stop operations in the territory if amendments to its data protection law that would make them liable for doxxing campaigns come into effect.
On the Lighter Side Get A Job With #TikTokResumes: Nearly three dozen companies are participating in a pilot program that lets people apply to jobs by submitting a video resume via TikTok. 
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: July 2, 2021

Internet Governance

Antitrust Complaints Against Facebook Dismissed: The Federal Trade Commission’s initial antitrust complaint against Facebook was dismissed on the basis that the FTC failed to plead enough support for its claim that Facebook is a monopoly; a similar, separate antitrust suit brought by the attorneys general of 48 states was also dismissed.

Adequacy Decisions Allow For Data Flow Between EU And UK: The European Commission adopted two decisions finding that the United Kingdom provides an adequate level of data protection, which ensures that data can lawfully flow between the UK and the bloc after the expiration of a post-Brexit transition phase; the adequacy decisions are set to expire after four years, but will be renewed upon a showing that the UK continues to ensure an adequate level of protection.   
Privacy

Report Finds That Federal Agencies Lack Transparency Around Facial Recognition Use: A report by the Government Accountability Office found that thirteen of the twenty U.S. federal agencies that use facial recognition technology have little awareness of which private or non-federal systems their employees use.

Maine Passes Country’s Strongest Ban On Government Use Of Facial Recognition Tech: The new law prohibits most government use of the technology, plugs loopholes that previously allowed law enforcement to run searches via unofficial channels, and requires that logs of searches be maintained as public records. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Second LinkedIn Breach Exposes 700 Million Users’ Information: Following a similar breach in April, LinkedIn has once again been breached, and the hackers have posted user information including phone numbers, geolocation data, and inferred salaries for sale online; the hackers obtained the data by misusing the site’s official API.
Free Expression and Censorship

Florida Social Media Law Enjoined: The law, which would punish social media companies for deplatforming or banning politicians or political candidates for violating the companies’ terms, was found to threaten free-speech rights by “[compelling] providers to host speech that violates their standards—speech they otherwise would not host—and forbids providers from speaking as they otherwise would.” 
Practice Note

SCOTUS Narrows Scope Of FCRA Class Action Based On Standing: In TransUnion v. Ramirez, the Court determined that over three-quarters of an 8,185-plaintiff class in a Fair Credit Reporting Act case lacked standing because they did not suffer a concrete injury as a result of the FCRA violations alleged. 
On the Lighter Side

This Beer Bot Keeps You Refreshed Wherever You Go: Just in time for summer, Heineken’s limited-edition BOT (Beer Outdoor Transporter) carries twelve cold ones and can follow you almost wherever you’re headed. 
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: June 25, 2021

Internet Governance

Google Faces Antitrust Investigation In EU Over Advertising Business: After initiating a preliminary probe in 2019, EU antitrust regulators have launched a formal investigation into whether Google leverages its position in the digital advertising marketplace to restrict competition from competing online advertising businesses; the company is already under investigation for similar practices in the United States.

Revel’s Ride-Hailing Plans Fall Through After NYC Closes Licensing Loophole: The moped company planned to exploit an electric-vehicle exemption to the city’s cap on for-hire vehicles to introduce a Tesla-based ride-hailing service in Manhattan, but the City’s Taxi and Limousine Commission voted to eliminate the exemption; the Commission defended its vote as protecting drivers and limiting congestion, while critics call the decision a “step backward” on fighting climate change.   
Privacy

EU Regulators Advocate For Biometric-Based AI Ban In Public Spaces: In response to the recent AI regulatory framework published by the European Commission, the European Data Protection Board and the European Data Protection Supervisor issued a join opinion urging the EU to ban the use of AI for biometric identification in publicly accessible areas, and also for social scoring. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Hackers Using Fake Microsoft Customer Support To Install Ransomware: The BazarCall cybercrime group has been tricking users into installing ransomware by posing as Microsoft customer support; the hackers will first send targets phishing emails with instructions to call a fake customer support number to purportedly cancel a renewing subscription, and then instruct victims via phone to download an infected Excel file.
Intellectual Property

NFT Of Rapper Jay-Z’s Debut Album Sparks Copyright Suit: A lawsuit by Jay-Z’s Roc-A-Fella Records against its co-founder Damon Dash alleges that Dash is unlawfully attempting to sell his share of the copyright to Jay-Z’s debut album as an NFT; Dash counters that he’s simply attempting to sell his share of Roc-A-Fella Records, and not the album itself.
Free Expression and Censorship

DOJ Seizes Domains Of Iranian, Yemeni, And Palestinian News Outlets: The American-owned domains of 36 news outlets in the countries were seized because the outlets promoted misinformation campaigns and violated U.S. sanctions against certain terrorist groups, according to a DOJ press release.

SCOTUS Finds That School District Violated Student’s First Amendment Rights In Suspending For Snapchat Posts: The Court ruled that a Pennsylvania high school went too far when it suspended a student from the varsity cheerleading squad after she posted profanity-laced content related to the school on Snapchat; in the decision, the Court reaffirmed that schools have limited power to regulate students’ off-campus speech and found that the posts at issue warranted First Amendment protection because they amounted to criticisms of the poster’s community and didn’t significantly interfere with school.  
On the Lighter Side

Facebook Enters The Augmented-Reality Wearables Game: A newly-published patent shows that Facebook has designed an AR hat, which appears to be just a baseball hat with an AR screen suspended from the brim. 
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: June 18, 2021

Internet Governance

Lina Khan Named FTC Chair Shortly After Confirmation: In an unusual move, President Biden elevated the newly confirmed commissioner to chair mere hours after her confirmation, which potentially signals that the administration plans to take an aggressive antitrust enforcement approach against Big Tech companies.   
Privacy

CJEU Clarifies One-Stop-Shop Rule For Privacy Investigations: In a ruling that could expose tech companies to more GDPR cases in the EU, the Court of Justice of the European Union held that despite the one-stop-shop rule, which provides that companies are subject to GDPR enforcement only by the supervisory authorities of the member states in which they have their main establishment, other member states’ supervisory authorities may also take enforcement action if certain conditions are met. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Second Major Internet Outage In Ten Days Cripples Websites: This time, a system failure at content delivery network Akmai Technologies caused outages at banks, airlines, and stock exchanges around the globe; affected companies reported minor disruptions and have returned to service.

Peloton Bike+ Vulnerable To Hacking: A cybersecurity company reported a vulnerability that allows hackers to potentially install apps to steal users’ login information and spy on riders via remote access to a bike’s camera and microphone; public-facing bikes, such as those in gyms and hotels, are most at-risk, as hackers need to physically access the bike’s USB port to exploit the vulnerability.
Free Expression and Censorship

Facebook Removes Fake Accounts In Lead-Up To Ethiopia’s Election: The accounts, which were linked to individuals associated with the country’s Information Network Security Agency and which posted about the Prosperity Party, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, and U.S. sanctions, were removed for violating the platform’s rules against misleading and inauthentic behavior.  
Practice Note

SCOTUS Gives LinkedIn Second Crack At Preventing Scraping: The 9th Circuit previously rejected the company’s allegation that competitor hiQ’s scraping publicly available information off LinkedIn’s platform violated the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, but the Court remanded the case in light of its recent ruling in Van Buren v. United States, which limited the Act’s applicability.  
On the Lighter Side

“Warning Lights” For Your Body: The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated research into the extent to which wearable devices such as Apple Watches, Oura rings, and Fitbits can operate as predictors of illness. 
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: June 11, 2021

Internet Governance

Senate Passes Comprehensive Tech And Manufacturing Bill: The bipartisan legislation, which responds to increasing competition from China, would authorize $250 billion for technology research and development and would restrict the purchase and use of certain technologies from the country.

El Salvador Becomes First Nation To Adopt Bitcoin: The cryptocurrency is now legal tender after the country’s legislature adopted it in an effort to make it easier for Salvadorans across the world to send money back home to family and friends; most Salvadorans lack traditional banking and rely on remittances that account for nearly a quarter of the country’s GDP.   
Privacy

Report Finds Privacy Tech Industry At “Inflection Point”: A report by the Future of Privacy Forum finds that as consumers become more connected, and as regulatory compliance becomes a growing need for companies, privacy technology has become a multi-billion-dollar market sector. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Major Websites Briefly Forced Offline After Bug Triggered: The vast outage took place as a result of a hidden bug in a software deployment from Fastly, a cloud computing service provider used by many web publishers; Fastly immediately patched the bug and has initiated system reviews to prevent against future outages, but the incident draws attention to the potential dangers of the consolidation of cloud services.

Biden Revokes Trump-Era Ban On Chinese Apps, But Calls For Supply Chain Security: President Biden revoked the executive order intended to ban TikTok, WeChat, and other Chinese apps on the basis that they share Americans’ information with Chinese authorities; in his own executive order, Biden called for an evaluation of threats to the information supply chain and instructed the Commerce Department to develop recommendations for protecting Americans’ information from foreign adversaries. 
Intellectual Property

Facebook Delays Taking Cut Of Creators’ Revenue: The company announced that it will wait until 2023 before taking a portion of earnings generated by users who share content or promote events, and stoked its ongoing feud with Apple by noting that when revenue sharing does begin, Facebook’s cut will be less than the 30 percent that Apple takes from app developers.
Practice Note

FTC Settles With MoviePass Over Deceptive Practices: The now-defunct company, which once allowed subscribers to see unlimited movies in theaters for $10 per month, is alleged to have changed customer passwords and blocked accounts outright to keep users from being able to take advantage of the service; under the settlement, the company’s parents and principals are barred from further misrepresenting their business practices.  
On the Lighter Side

Apple Nearly Revives The Away Message For Texts: Apple’s Focus, a feature that allows users to set notification filters for certain apps to minimize distraction, now notifies texters when you have Focus mode engaged so they know you’re away. 
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: June 4, 2021

Internet Governance

Digital Wallets Coming Soon To The EU: Within a year, the EU plans to roll out bloc-wide technology that will allow citizens to store things like driver’s licenses, payment cards, and passwords digitally to make access to public and private services more efficient.

SCOTUS Limits Computer Fraud And Abuse Act Scope: In Van Buren v. United States, the Court overturned the conviction of a police officer who searched his department’s license plate database for purposes outside the scope of his official duties, concluding that the CFAA’s “exceeds authorized access” clause applies to only “those who obtain information from particular areas in the computer—such as files, folders or databases—to which their computer access does not extend,” and “does not cover those who . . . have improper motives for obtaining information that is otherwise available to them;” the Court noted that to adopt a broader reading of the statute would criminalize a vast swath of ordinary computing activity. 
Privacy

Privacy Advocacy Group Issues Cookie-Banner Complaints To 500 Companies: The Max Schrems-led privacy group NOYB issued the complaints, alleging that the companies’ cookie banners violate the GDPR by making it difficult for users to opt out of tracking cookies; NOYB has developed an automated system to analyze cookie banners and generate complaints for GDPR noncompliance, and plans to issue draft complaints to 10,000 of Europe’s most-visited sites in an effort to get them to change their practices before resorting to formal proceedings.

Amazon Ring’s Neighbors App Gets Transparency Update: In response to concerns about law enforcement access to Ring home-surveillance-device information, beginning on June 7th, law enforcement agencies will no longer be permitted to email Ring users directly to solicit footage; law enforcement will only be able to request footage via a public bulletin, through posts by verified profiles that include criteria such as case number and agency contact information. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Russian Cybercrime Group REvil Responsible For JBS Hack: The White House and the FBI have confirmed that the notorious group was behind the recent attack that crippled JBS, a Brazilian company that supplies nearly one-fifth of the world’s meat. 

NYC’s MTA Hacked: The Metropolitan Transit Authority, which operates the New York City subway system, announced that it was the victim of a cyberattack; the hackers, who are suspected of being part of a Chinese espionage operation, exploited a vulnerability in the Pulse Connect Secure VPN system and made their way into the MTA’s systems, but did not make away with any data.
Free Expression & Censorship

Instagram And Facebook Respond To Accusations Of Suppressing Pro-Palestinian Viewpoints: In the wake of the recent conflict in Gaza, Instagram will change its algorithm to give equal weight to original and shared content after employees complained that the old algorithm, which favored original posts over shared ones, had the effect of suppressing pro-Palestinian content; at Facebook, employees have called for a third-party audit of the company’s moderation practices related to Muslim and Arab content.
Practice Note

Amazon Nixes Arbitration And Allows Consumers To Sue In Court: After receiving thousands of individual arbitration demands from customers who use the company’s Echo device, Amazon did away with the arbitration clause in its terms of service, and now invites aggrieved customers to file suit in court.  
On the Lighter Side Another Famous Meme Sells As NFT: The 14-year-old “Charlie bit me” video, which is one of the most-viewed internet videos of all-time, has sold as an NFT for over £500,000; the brothers who appear in the video plan to use the money to attend university.  
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: May 28, 2021

Internet Governance

D.C. Attorney General Brings Antitrust Suit Against Amazon: The suit alleges that Amazon’s practice of blocking third-party sellers from selling their products on other platforms amounts to a monopoly practice that violates the District of Columbia’s Antitrust Act.
Privacy

WhatsApp Sues India’s Government Over Message-Traceability Law: The country’s Intermediary Guidelines and Digital Media Ethics Code, which is intended in part to track the origins of misinformation, requires messaging apps such as WhatsApp to identify the “first originator of information”; WhatsApp argues that a requirement that it trace messages would threaten end-to-end encryption and jeopardize user privacy.

Privacy Groups In EU And UK Sue Clearview AI: The lawsuits in the UK, France, Austria, Greece, and Italy allege that the controversial facial-recognition company’s practice of scraping photos from across the internet to populate its database of more than three billion images violates the GDPR. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Crime App Citizen Targeted In Large-Scale Scraping Incident: A hacktivist scraped from the crime-reporting app and posted online data including incident location information, police radio audio files, images, and more; while the data is publicly accessible on the app itself, the aggregation and centralization of it on the web reveals how much data Citizen processes, and could potentially be useful for tracking the app’s adoption and use.
Free Expression & Censorship

Florida Law Prohibits Tech Companies From Banning Politicians: The new law, which is intended to curb the “censorship” of conservative individuals and viewpoints by tech companies, makes it unlawful for such companies to de-platform political candidates or news outlets and grants Floridians the right to sue over content moderation decisions; violators are subject to daily fines of up to $250,000, but the law is likely to be challenged.

Facebook Plans To Limit Distribution Of Content Of Users Who Post Misinformation: While the social network already limits the visibility of posts containing misinformation, it will now begin to limit the reach of all content from users found to routinely post misinformation on the platform.
Practice Note

USPTO Makes .DOCX Preferred Filing Format: The move is part of an effort to “modernize and streamline [the] patent application system,” by, among other things, making it easier for the Office to automatically process submissions; users who wish to file using .PDF format will be subject to a fee.  
On the Lighter Side TikTok

Gets A New Voice: The popular video-streaming platform updated the audio of its text-to-voice feature after the actor whose voice was used for the original version of the feature sued, alleging that TikTok used her voice without authorization.  
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: May 21, 2021

Internet Governance

Cryptocurrency Values Plummet As China Reinforces Ban: Bitcoin, Ethereum, and other cryptocurrency values dropped by up to 30% after China’s Internet Finance Association announced that the country’s financial institutions cannot engage in business related to cryptocurrencies on account of their volatility. 

FTC, States, Allege Frontier Communications Misrepresented Internet Speeds: In a new lawsuit, the Commission and six state attorneys general allege that the company charged or attempted to charge consumers for internet rates that the company did not actually provide.
Privacy

Amazon Extends Ban On Law Enforcement Use Of Facial Recognition Software: After announcing nearly a year ago that it would prohibit law enforcement agencies from using the controversial Rekognition system for at least one year, Amazon has now extended the ban indefinitely. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Consumer Reports And Advocacy Organizations Create Dark Patterns Tipline: The newly created tipline is designed to be a resource for consumers and a tool for collecting examples of dark patterns to inform advocacy work.

Colonial Pipeline Confirms Paying $4.4m Ransom To Resume Service: The company’s CEO acknowledged the payment, noting that the decision to pay came after consultation with experts familiar with DarkSide, the criminal group behind the hack.
Free Expression & Censorship

Twitter Scraps Image-Cropping Algorithm Over Bias: The social media company will largely abandon the algorithm, whose automatically generated previews of photos accompanying tweets were found to favor white people over black people and women over men.
Practice Note

Apple Moves To Dismiss Epic’s “Essential Facilities” Claim: As the antitrust trial between the companies wages on, Apple argues that Epic has failed to offer proof that it has violated the essential facilities doctrine, an element of antitrust law that prevents companies from implementing bottlenecks to exclude competitors, by preventing Epic from accessing iOS.  
On the Lighter Side

New Deepfake Technique May Make Film Overdubbing A Thing Of The Past: A new deepfake technology syncs actors’ lips and facial movements with foreign-language dialogue to make it appear that the actor is delivering their lines in the foreign language.  
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: May 14, 2021

Internet Governance

Biden Teams With Uber And Lyft To Offer Free Transportation To Vaccination Sites: As part of its plan to vaccinate 70% of U.S. adults by July 4, the administration has reached agreements with the ridesharing companies through which they’ll offer free rides to vaccine-getters in exchange for data about nearly 80,000 vaccination sites across the country.

EU’s Second-Highest Court Rejects €250 Million Tax Bill For Amazon: The ruling by the General Court of the European Union amounted to a win for the tech giant against the European Commission, which levied the tax in response to Amazon’s allegedly unlawfully funneling revenue from EU sales through a Luxembourg-based subsidiary.
Privacy

German Data Protection Authority Bans Facebook From Processing WhatsApp Data: The ban comes in response to the Facebook-owned messaging app’s rollout of new terms of use, which the regulator maintains are illegal because they require users to either consent or be cut off from using the service. 
Information Security and Cyberthreats

Colonial Pipeline Resumes Operations As Biden Signs Cybersecurity Executive Order: The major fuel artery, which shut down for five days after being targeted in a cyberattack, is back online; on the heels of the attack, President Biden signed an executive order to “improve the nation’s cybersecurity” by creating a “playbook” to protect federal networks and strengthen breach response.
Intellectual Property

YouTube Shorts Will Pay Content Creators $100 Million Over The Next Year: The Google-owned video service’s new payment program is designed to incentivize creators to continually post to its platform as a way to compete with TikTok and Snapchat, which began paying content creators in 2020.
Free Expression & Censorship

Proposed UK Law Would Prohibit Tech Companies From Discriminating Based On Political Views: The proposed Online Safety Bill includes an anti-censorship clause that would require tech companies to protect “democratically important” content by prohibiting discrimination based on political viewpoint and require that companies adopt and evenhandedly apply policies for protecting such content.

Instagram Blames Removal Of Posts About Al-Aqsa Mosque On “Enforcement Error”: Posts about the mosque, which has been at the center of ongoing clashes between Israeli police and Palestinians, were removed or restricted after the holy site’s name was confused with those of terrorist organizations appearing on the platform’s list of Dangerous Organizations and Individuals; Facebook later clarified that the mosque’s name on its own does not violate company policies.
On the Lighter Side

Paralyzed Individual Writes Using Thoughts, Assisted By Neural Implants: Two implants in the premotor cortex, the area of the brain thought to be responsible for forming intentions to perform motor movements, translated the paralyzed study participant’s thoughts about forming characters into legible, on-screen letters.  
Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP
Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP

CLIP-ings: May 7, 2021

Internet Governance

N.Y. Attorney General Finds FCC Was Flooded With Fake Comments In Lead-up To 2017 Net Neutrality Repeal: A years-long investigation resulted in a report that concludes that nearly 18 million of the 22 million public comments received regarding the net neutrality roll-back order were fake and the product of an industry effort to influence the Federal Communications Commission’s decision making.

Labor Department Rescinds Trump-proposed “Independent Contractor Rule”: The withdrawal of the Rule, which would have made it easier for gig-economy companies like Uber and Lyft to classify workers as independent contractors, signifies a policy shift toward stronger worker protections such as guaranteed wage and overtime pay.

Privacy

School Apps Found To Share Student Data: A recent study by nonprofit technology group Me2B Alliance found that 60 percent of mobile apps used in schools across the country transmit student data to third parties through the use of software development kits, which collect and share user data with analytics and marketing firms. 

Information Security and Cyberthreats

Peloton Leaves Sensitive User Data Exposed: A bug in the home-workout company’s API left exposed customer profiles that included personal information such as age, location, birthday, and workout data; the bug, which was discovered by a security researcher, has now been patched.

Intellectual Property

Musicians Implore Spotify To Not Implement Speech-recognition Tech: 180 musicians and human rights activists have asked the streaming service to never “use, license, sell, or monetize” a recently patented technology that would enable it to recommend music based on listeners’ “emotional state, gender, age, or accent,” arguing that the technology is “emotionally manipulative, discriminatory against trans and non-binary people, violates privacy and data security, and exacerbates inequality in the music industry.”

Free Expression & Censorship

Facebook Oversight Board Upholds Trump Ban, But Punts Ultimate Decision Back To Facebook: The Board concluded that the social network was correct to ban the former President for violating the site’s terms of service in posts related to the January 6th Capitol riots, but found the indefinite ban to be “vague” and “standardless”; the Board has given Facebook six months to determine an appropriate duration for the ban.

Practice Note

Ninth Circuit Denies Snapchat Section 230 Defense In Case Alleging Negligent Design: The court found that Section 230 does not provide immunity from allegations that Snapchat knew or should have known that its “speed filter,” which superimposed a user’s current speed on their Snaps and rewarded users for reaching certain speeds, would encourage people to drive their vehicles dangerously fast; the plaintiffs in the case are the parents of three boys who were killed in a high-speed car crash in which the speed filter was a factor.

On the Lighter Side

AI System Reduces Food Waste By 40 Percent: A grocery store in Poland is attempting to reduce food waste by using AI to automatically lower the prices of perishable food items as they approach their sell-by dates.

Olivier Sylvain Academic Director, Fordham CLIP

Tom Norton Executive Director, Fordham CLIP